Evy McDonald: The Power of Love

Early in 1980, Evy McDonald felt her body begin to crumble. The middle-aged nurse lost the ability to control her movements, and soon enough she couldn’t walk at all. Her doctor diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

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The Singing Revolution

In their own way and in their own time, and using their voices alone, the people of Estonia fought for their independence. Estonian activist Heinz Valk called it “the Singing Revolution.” He says of that time, “Until now, revolutions have been filled with destruction, burning, killing and hate, but we started our revolution with a smile and a song.”

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Story of Hope: Pete Seeger

Our stories can heal us.

Our own stories, when told in new ways, can heal us; and we can also be healed by one another’s stories. Sometimes our voices tell our stories. Sometimes they sing them out.

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The Butterfly in the Diving Bell

In 1995, Jean-Dominique Bauby was at the top of his game. He was the high-powered editor-in-chief of the French Elle magazine. He had a beautiful home and plenty of money, two sweet children and a beautiful new girlfriend. He reveled in good food and good wine. He was well-liked, and well-loved. He had plenty of friends in high places. He was 43 years old, and he was one of the movers and shakers.

Then one day, in the blink of an eye, everything changed.

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Ro Vaccaro: The Butterfly Lady

She saved monarch memorabilia the way a mother saves all of her firstborn’s artwork and school assignments. Boxes and boxes of letters, handouts, and newspaper clippings. If it had to do with the monarch butterflies of Pacific Grove, California, Ro Vaccaro put it in a box and kept it.

“I wear a butterfly every day, at least somewhere-but usually multiple butterflies. I have a butterfly watch, butterfly earrings, butterflies on my shoes and socks.”

Ro Vaccaro, the “Butterfly Lady” of Pacific Grove, lived and breathed monarch butterflies.

She came upon her first-in the shape of an exquisite pin-many years earlier, at an estate auction. She picked up the pin and held it in her hand. She was in the middle of a divorce at the time, and she said to her sister, Beverly, “I feel better just holding it.” That was the beginning of a metamorphosis that would transform her life.

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